OVERVIEW

Community Achieves defines the Social Services pillar as follows: Communities and schools work together to meet the basic needs of students and families in crisis or social/economic hardship, including adult development.

Our goal is that Community Achieves schools form networks of results-focused partners to support the school community in achieving these common outcomes:

  1. Students' basic needs of food and clothing are met

  2. Students and families have access to the range of public services relevant to their needs

  3. Parents and community adults are actively involved in personal development

COMMON ASKS: Social Services
 
2016-17 data will be added very soon.
 
In order to meet the outcomes listed above, the following needs have been identified across all Community Achieves schools.
  • Clothing closet (Standard School Attire; winter clothing) donations/support
  • Food pantry/food backpack donations/support
  • School supplies; classroom supplies - donations/support
  • On-site workshops & classes for adults
    • GED, career skills, nutrition/wellness, parenting, support groups, adult ESL, social services info & assistance, financial literacy, homebuying, job skills/readiness, housing/utilities, tax preparation, adult literacy, Gradespeed accounts and utilization
  • Adult mental health support
  • Family Emergency Fund donations
 
 

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

Review the common asks listed above, or check out Community Achieves schools' site-specific needs and asks in the box below. Then, respond to the Social Services Invitation to Participate by submitting a response via the form to the right!

NOTE: You must be logged in to view the form and submit responses.

Click here to register!

ITP Form ITP Form

Site-Specific Needs & Asks Site-Specific Needs & Asks

NEEDS & ASKS BY CLUSTER

Antioch Cluster  •  Cane Ridge Cluster  •  Glencliff Cluster  •  Hunters Lane Cluster  •  Maplewood Cluster  •  McGavock Cluster  •  Overton Cluster  •  Pearl-Cohn Cluster  •  Stratford Cluster  •  Whites Creek Cluster

 

NEEDS & ASKS BY INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL

Antioch High  •  Bailey Middle  •  Buena Vista Elementary  •  Cole Elementary  •  Creswell Middle  •  DuPont Hadley Middle  •  Gra-Mar Middle  •  Hunters Lane High  •  Inglewood Elementary  •  Jere Baxter Middle  •  Joelton Middle  •  Margaret Allen Middle  •  McKissack Middle  •  Napier Elementary  •  Pearl-Cohn High  •  Tusculum Elementary  •  Whitsitt Elementary


Antioch Cluster

Antioch High School:

74% of Antioch’s students were classified as Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15.  Additionally, based on data from the United Way 211 Call Center, approximately 1400 callers in the Antioch cluster requested assistance with housing in 2014; approximately 1250 requested assistance with food/meals and utilities. 

Antioch has a Family Resource Center (FRC) through United Way and Family Children's Services, which distributes food through the Second Harvest Food Pantry. The FRC is also structured to provide standard school attire for students, as needed.

Antioch is inviting community organizations and individuals to provide any resources that will increase Antioch’s capacity to provide needed food and clothing to students and families.

Additionally, to promote the adults and families in our community, Antioch is inviting organizations and individuals to partner with the school to provide programming to support the professional development of adults in the community, including adult literacy, Job Fairs, resume' writing workshops, financial planning courses. 

Though Antioch coordinates services with some existing partners, e.g., Second Harvest Food Bank for food distribution, Antioch is inviting additional community organizations and individuals to join the partnership to increase the number of families that have food available on a regular basis as well as during school holidays.

Additionally, Antioch is seeking partnerships to increase the number of students and families who are provided information about public services, programs, and supports for needs such as:

  • clothing/Standard School Attire assistance
  • housing/utility assistance
  • transportation
  • health/TENNcare insurance and health screenings

 

Margaret Allen Middle Prep:

Ninety one percent of the Margaret Allen students are categorized as economically disadvantaged. Faculty and staff have noted a need for family assistance with clothing for standard school attire and warm coats and accessories for the cold months. Standard school attire includes the following: black, khaki, or navy slacks, shorts, or fingertip length skirts; blue jeans without holes or rips; solid colored collared shirts; solid colored sweat shirts; tennis shoes and closed toe shoes. Also related to the high rates of economic disadvantage is the need to provide resources and supports to families for adult development. Margaret Allen would like to host a career fair for the families and adults in our community.

Cane Ridge Cluster

Cole Elementary School:

Almost half of the students at Cole ES were classified as English Language Learners (ELL) during the 2014-15 school year.  As such, a large percentage of family members are also English language learners.  Cole has and will continue to offer classes for adult English learners through partnerships with TFLI and the Southeast Library.  We are inviting community organizations to help us expand these offerings and bring training to the school after school hours, in the evenings, and/or on the weekends.

93% of Cole’s students were classified as Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15.  Since family income level is generally highly correlated with under or unemployment and education level, Cole would like to promote, offer information about, and potentially provide transportation to existing GED classes, job readiness training, job fairs, etc., to adult family members of students and members of the community.  The Cole Family Resource Center currently refers adults to these existing resources, but is trying to build a larger referral base to serve the needs of the adults in the community. In some cases, the adult family members also need volunteers to go with them to serve as advocates and/or translators.

The Cole Family Resource Center also provides information on and makes a lot of referrals for mental health.  We are inviting organizations and individuals to help us integrate mental health awareness into some of our existing family events and to become part of our referral base, and/or to help us develop an event for targeted families that would focus on some of the areas we have noticed a need for: depression, post-partum depression, behavioral ADD, trauma, domestic violence, and spectrum disorders.

Glencliff Cluster 

Whitsitt Elementary School:

93 percent of our students come from economically disadvantaged homes. In the 2014-15 school year, almost 60% of the students were classified as EL learners; almost 70% were identified as Hispanic. Whitsitt families often are in need. We'd like to offer a clothing closet for our students and their families. While the school has begun to resource a clothing closet in 2015-16, we will need donations on a continuous basis, especially as winter arrives and there is an increased need for cold weather clothing. With Whitsitt’s huge Spanish-language population, there is a need for English classes. Right now, we have Conexion Americas slated to start their Parents as Partner programs on Wednesday, September 9.

Hunters Lane Cluster

Hunters Lane High School:

Of the students who qualified for FRL during the 2014-15 school year, only 37% participated in lunch and 22% in breakfast, indicating a slight increase from the previous year. 55 HLHS families received turkeys and hams for Thanksgiving 2013. An average of 35-40 students received bags with nutritious snacks on a weekly basis in 2013-14. According to the United Way 2-1-1 Call Center, in 2014, there were approximately 1750 calls from the Hunters Lane cluster looking for housing resources; there were approximately 1800 calls from the Hunters Lane cluster looking for food and/or meals; and there were approximately 2000 calls from the Hunters Lane cluster looking for utility assistance. Though Hunters Lane coordinates services with some existing partners, e.g., Packed With Love and Second Harvest Food Bank for food distribution, Hunters Lane is inviting additional community organizations and individuals to join the partnership to increase the number of families that have food available on a regular basis as well as during school holidays. Additionally, Hunters Lane is seeking partnerships to increase the number of students and families who are provided information about public services, programs, and supports for needs such as: • tax preparation • clothing/Standard School Attire assistance • housing/utility assistance • transportation • health/TENNcare insurance and health screenings Adult development initiatives (e.g., GED preparation, English language classes, career training, financial/money management, etc.)

Maplewood Cluster 

Gra-Mar Middle Prep:

United Way's 2-1-1 Helpline categorizes telephone requests for services and assistance. Within our geographical region, the Maplewood cluster, in 2014, there were almost 2500 requests for assistance with food and meals; there were almost 1000 calls requesting information or assistance to meet clothing needs. Because of this we are requesting assistance in the areas of clothing and food. We would like to offer a food pantry and clothing closet onsite at Gra-Mar Middle Prep. Gra-Mar Middle Prep is looking for agencies that can assist with standard school attire Pants/ Skirts (Khaki, Black, Navy, and Blue Jeans) Shirts (All shirts need to have a collar and need to be a solid color). We are also looking for belts for our boys and girls. Gra-Mar Middle Prep is looking for organizations that can support us with starting a community garden and help us set-up and maintain a food pantry. We are also looking for organizations that can help with weekend food filled backpacks for students who struggle with having food and a way to prepare that food at home and over the weekend.

 

Jere Baxter Middle Prep:

Over 90% of the students at JBMS are classified as economically disadvantaged.  Additionally, based on data provided by the United Way 2-1-1 Helpline, almost 2500 calls were received from the people in the Jere Baxter requesting assistance with food, housing, and utilities.

To address some of the community needs, Jere Baxter began development of a food pantry and a clothing closet.  Thus far, donations of food and clothing have allowed us to do an initial stocking, allowing us to distribute 20 food boxes ad provide clothing items to keep 80 students in Standard School Attire.  Clothing items are distributed because students do not have enough uniforms at home, uniforms are too small, or students have accidents during the school day tha require new clothing. We have also supplied clothing for a family of 8 who lost everything due to a house fire.

JBMP is seeking assistance from organizations and individuals to continue to stock our food pantry and clothing closet throughout the year with donations and/or drives. Because JBMP requires students to wear Standard School Attire, we are especially in need of the following: pants/skirts/shorts (khaki, black, or navy); collared and solid color shirts; belts, shoes, undershirts, socks, and underwear.  We would also like help providing school supplies to our students on an as-needed basis.

We would like to promote the adults and families in our community at Jere Baxter by inviting organizations and individuals to partner with the school to provide programming to support the professional development of adults in the community, including adult literacy, Job Fairs, resume' writing workshops, financial planning courses, Computer Literacy classes, Etiquette Classes, Job Readiness Classes, GED classes, and English Language classes. Partners are also sought to provide supports for housing security, Job Search and utility assistance; and to increase family access to healthcare and capacity to navigate the healthcare system.


McGavock Cluster 

Dupont Hadley Middle Prep:

Almost 70% of the DHMP students are categorized as economically disadvantaged. United Way's 2-1-1 Helpline categorizes telephone requests for services and assistance. Within our geographic cluster, in 2014, approximately 1000 calls were made to request information or assistance with household utilities and with income support; over 1500 of the callers requested assistance with food. The greatest area of need requested was within the category of housing assistance. DHMP would like to ask the community for support for our Social Services outreach. Specifically, we are looking for community organizations or individuals to partner with the school and other existing partners to provide the following: • assistance in promoting our food pantry, in partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank • assistance in building and promoting our clothing closet, which supports DHMP Standard School Attire requirements • strategic planning to address the health needs of the community • information and/or assistance for utilities for families in need expanding the student College and Career Fair held in the Spring to adult community members

 

Napier Enhanced Option Elementary School:

A review of data provided by the United Way 2-1-1 program for the McGavock cluster shows there were almost 2,500 calls requesting assistance with utilities and housing; the same area had over 1500 calls requesting assistance with food/meals. 

In 2014-2015, 98% of students qualified for free and reduced meals, based on household income.

While Napier has a strong core of community partnerships that assist to meet social services needs of students and families, they are inviting additional community organizations to help them reach more community members. 

Napier wants to increase availability of food during out of school activities, on a regular basis, and during holidays. 

Napier wants to provide clothing needs for students to stay in compliance with standard school attire. Napier is asking for donations of standard school attire (khaki pants, skirts, polo shirts, belts, socks and underwear) to the Family Resource Center. 

Napier is hoping to start a lunch buddy program with students to increase positive mentoring relationships with students. We are looking for mentors to volunteer in the program.

Napier wants to increase the number of families that receive information and referrals to public services and availability of programs, as well as the number of referrals to individually relevant public services. 

Napier also seeks partners related to adult social-emotional services to assist our parents with their own emotional support.


Overton Cluster 

Tusculum Elementary School:

Coming soon

Pearl-Cohn Cluster 

Buena Vista Enhanced Option Elementary School:

Nearly 100 percent of Buena Vista’s student population are currently living in poverty. Furthermore, our school is the only elementary school that serves all of Nashville’s inner-city homeless shelters, making our mobility rate 78 percent; the highest in the district. Data collected by United Way’s 211 service shows that the highest number of calls within the Pearl Cohn Cluster are for housing assistance, utility/rent assistance, and food. Our families are consistently struggling to meet basic needs at home and at school. Buena Vista collects school supplies and school uniforms on a continuous basis to distribute to our families at no cost. Demand is high and supply is low, often creating a shortage for students in need. Buena Vista has a partnership with Second Harvest to send home backpacks of food over the weekend for families who share that they are facing food insecurity. However, Buena Vista’s Second Harvest food program was cut this year, leaving us able to serve only 114 students as compared to 175 last year. BVEOES encourages organizations to adopt BVEOES and create a “ Food Backpack” program of weekend food to help us make up that deficit. BVEOES seeks partners who are willing to coordinate, seek, or provide donations for the following items: school supplies, school uniforms, winter apparel, backpacks, holiday meals, holiday gifts, and food. BVEOES also invites partners and individuals to donate to a Family Emergency Fund, which could be used to assist families who are struggling to pay rent and utilities, especially in the winter months when bills are traditionally higher. BVEOES is interested in offering classes and programs geared towards adult education (GED classes), as well as career advancement (resume’ writing, job interviewing skills, job fair, etc.). Other classes of interest would include: nutrition services, fitness/wellness, relevant support groups, parenting skill-based groups, etc. It is our hope to assist and empower our families in their efforts to mitigate the effects of generational poverty.
 

McKissack Middle Prep:

Based on data provided from the United Way 2-1-1- call line, in the Pearl-Cohn cluster that housing, utility assistance, and food assistance are the greatest needs. Our school’s data show only 50% of students are participating in breakfast and only 88% in lunch. As of the 2014-15 school year, All MNPS STUDENTS are eligible for free meals. Based on recent census data, 15% of adults Nashville over the age of 25 are without a high school diploma. To address these school and community needs, MMP invites community organizations and individuals to partner with the school to develop a community room to allow parents to pay bills, search for jobs, search for housing, and plan public transportation. Families can also use computers to increase engagement in their students’ education by accessing Gradespeed, reviewing student assignments/homework, and communicating with teachers. MMP is also seeking partners to provide resources, space, and teachers for a formal GED program. To address the needs of our students stemming from high levels of poverty, MMPS is seeking partners to increase our capacity to provide students with standard school attire (SSA) and school supplies. To increase the capacity of providing students and families with healthy food, MMP is seeking partners to support our community garden, to achieve the goal of sending our kids home with healthy food and teaching them how to cook healthy meals on a budget.
 

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Management Magnet High School:

91% of Pearl-Cohn’s students were classified as Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15. Additionally, based on data from the United Way 211 Call Center, over 2000 callers in the Pearl-Cohn cluster requested assistance with housing in 2014; approximately 1250 requested assistance with food/meals and utilities. Pearl-Cohn has a Family Resource Center (FRC) through United Way and Family Children's Services, which distributes food through the Second Harvest Food Pantry. The FRC is also structured to provide standard school attire for students, as needed. Pearl-Cohn is inviting community organizations and individuals to provide any resources that will increase Pearl-Cohn's capacity to provide needed food and clothing to students and families. Additionally, to promote the adults and families in our community, Pearl-Cohn is inviting organizations and individuals to partner with the school to provide programming to support the professional development of adults in the community, including adult literacy, Job Fairs, resume' writing workshops, financial planning courses. Partners are also sought to provide supports for housing security and utility assistance; and to increase family access to healthcare and capacity to navigate the healthcare system.

Stratford Cluster 

Bailey STEM Middle Prep: 

Bailey will continue to provide assistance with Standard School Attire, Well Child Screening, Winter Coats, and MTA Bus Passes. Bailey is not currently seeking additional partners to support social service or adult development outcomes.

 

Inglewood Elementary School:

95% of IES students are categorized as “economically disadvantaged.” To address factors associated with poverty in the home, IES plans to provide a variety of adult education experiences throughout the year, including Financial Empowerment education, adult college and career fair(s), and literacy training, among others. IES invites community organizations and individuals to partner with the school to promote the success of these programs and/or offer information or support to families in need of assistance with housing, e.g., stop-gap utility payments, rental assistance. At least 20 IES families are enrolled in food support through MNPS or are in need of food assistance through referral of support and counseling staff. As Second Harvest Food Bank’s resources are reduced due to shrinking grants and funding, IES needs ready access to pantry staples, fresh vegetables, perishables such as milk/bread/yogurt, infant formula, etc., to support the needs of these families. IES seeks partners who will donate weekly or monthly to the IES food pantry, either in product or gift cards. Volunteers are needed to help organize the donations. In addition to a food pantry, IES has identified the need to develop a clothing closet for students. The items identified as most needed include new shoes, Standard School Attire (collared shirts, khaki or navy blue pants, shorts, and skirts for warm and cold weather), socks/underwear, winter coats and accessories, diapers, school supplies/backpacks, and basic toiletries. IES invites community organizations and individuals to donate any of the above-listed supplies or resources, coordinate collection drives, and/or donate gift cards for school staff to use when necessary to meet urgent needs of IES families.

Whites Creek Cluster

Creswell Arts Magnet Middle Prep:

During the 2014-15 school year, 75% of Creswell students were eligible for free and reduced meals. Additionally, based on the percentage of economically disadvantaged families at Creswell, we have seen a great need for school uniforms to decrease the amount of students who are not properly dressed and do not have access to Standard School Attire. Beginning with the 2015-16 school year, Creswell is partnering with Second Harvest Food Bank to establish an onsite Food Pantry, during and outside of school hours. Creswell is inviting additional community organizations and individuals to partner with the school and Second Harvest to increase the amount of food available for distribution to an increased number of families during school, school holidays, and when students do not report to school. Creswell is also inviting community organizations to assist with clothing needs for students to meet the requirements for Standard School Attire through seeking, coordinating, or donating clothing items. Creswell needs shirts, long or short sleeve (polo, dress-style or turtleneck) in any solid color. We also need pants, shorts, and skirts in solid colors (black, navy blue, brown, khaki or grey). Items made of 100% cotton are best and can be made of polyester or linen. Creswell is also in need of belts (black, brown or grey) to wear with pants or shorts.

 

Joelton Middle Prep:

A review of data provided by the United Way 2-1-1 program for the Whites Creek cluster shows there were over 400 calls requesting assistance with utilities, housing and food and income support.  Last year, 2014-2015, 83% of students qualified for free and reduced meals and classified as economically disadvantaged.

Joelton wants to increase the number of families that receive information to public services and availability of programs.  Joelton also wants to provide clothing needs for students to stay in compliance with school attire.  Joelton is asking for donations of standard school attire (khaki pants, skirts, polo shirts, belts, socks and underwear).